What We Do and Don’t Know about Sex Offenders’ Intimacy Dispositions

What We Do and Don’t Know about Sex Offenders’ Intimacy Dispositions

What We Do and Don’t Know about Sex Offenders’ Intimacy Dispositions

What We Do and Don’t Know about Sex Offenders’ Intimacy Dispositionss

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Référence bibliographique [17488]

Aggression and Violent Behavior, vol. 19, no 4, p. 372-382.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he present article aims to better define the intimacy dispositions of sex offenders, and the role of intimacy in sexually abusive behaviors. This effort will hopefully lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the nature, extent, diversity, and specificity of intimacy abilities and deficits among sex offenders, and their potential implication in sexual offending.» (p. 373)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


This study «revealed the presence of an insecure type of attachment and high rates of childhood sexual abuse among sex offenders, which may predispose them negatively toward intimacy. Sex offenders are distinguished by specific intimacy deficits: an increased fear of rejection, and a low engagement in practices that favor intimacy with romantic partners and female friends. Lower engagement in intimacy-related practices has been shown to be associated with factors that are believed to increase sex offenders’ vulnerability to sexual aggression. Intimacy dispositions vary among types of sex offenders. Rapists are less engaged in intimacy-related practices with family members, while child molesters report more fear of rejection and sexual dissatisfaction relative to romantic relationships. […] The impact of sex offenders’ intimacy dispositions on sexuality is unknown. It is possible that certain individual dispositions (e.g. lowsexual self-esteem) hinder satisfaction of intimacy and sexual needs within romantic relationships. The resultant feelings of frustration and dissatisfaction could impel sex offenders to satisfy their needs through autoerotic sexual practices. […] Although only very limited aspects of intimacy have been studied, the current data are consistent with the existence of an association between aspects of intimacy and sexual aggression.» (p. 380)