Siblings of Children with Autism: Sibling Support Intervention Program

Siblings of Children with Autism: Sibling Support Intervention Program

Siblings of Children with Autism: Sibling Support Intervention Program

Siblings of Children with Autism: Sibling Support Intervention Programs

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Référence bibliographique [17370]

Gafoor, Keisha. 2015. «Siblings of Children with Autism: Sibling Support Intervention Program». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département d’éducation.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he present exploratory study proposes to systematically investigate a sibling support group with a focus on siblings of children with autism […].» (p. 19)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The sample comprised «[s]ix children (3 in control group and 3 in experimental group) between 7- and 13-years-old [...].» (p. iii) Les participants ont été recrutés à Montréal.

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif
- Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Descriptive findings suggest that children often benefitted from information about autism, and the strategies were deemed somewhat beneficial to sibling interactions and helped typically developing children to recognize their sibling’s abilities and limitations. In addition, children’s self-concept and their parents’ reports of internalizing and externalizing behaviors of the experimental group showed improvements from the pre-group session interview and the post-group session interviews. However, there were no consistent changes noted for the control group. The parents’ perceptions of family dynamics indicated little change between pre- and post-group.» (p. iii) More specifically, «TD [typically developing] children from the experimental group showed that after acquiring knowledge about autism, learning ways in which to engage with their sibling, and an open environment in which to discuss their feelings, that there appeared to be improvements in the relationship between siblings. Parents also felt that after the SSIP [The Sibling Support Intervention Program], their children would openly speak about what they had learned in the sessions and most parents’ perceptions were that there was an improvement in the interactions between their children.» (p. 77)