Home Smoking Bans May Increase the Risk of Smoking Onset in Children When Both Parents Smoke

Home Smoking Bans May Increase the Risk of Smoking Onset in Children When Both Parents Smoke

Home Smoking Bans May Increase the Risk of Smoking Onset in Children When Both Parents Smoke

Home Smoking Bans May Increase the Risk of Smoking Onset in Children When Both Parents Smokes

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Référence bibliographique [17297]

O’Loughlin, Jennifer L., Barry, Amadou-Diogo, O’Loughlin, Erin K. et Tremblay, Michèle. 2014. «Home Smoking Bans May Increase the Risk of Smoking Onset in Children When Both Parents Smoke ». Nicotine and Tobacco Research, vol. 16, no 7, p. 1-5.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of this analysis [is] to test for effect modification by home smoking bans in the association between parental smoking and smoking onset in their children.» (p. 1)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data were available in AdoQuest, a prospective investigation of 1,860 Grade 5 students aged 10–11 at cohort inception designed to investigate the cooccurrence of health-related behaviors in children. A stratified random sample of schools was recruited from French language schools in the greater Montreal area.» (p. 2)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«[R]easons cited by parents who smoke include that bans help conceal their own smoking behavior from their children, that bans communicate to children that smoking is not an acceptable behavior, and that bans are sometimes implemented at a child’s request […]. Home smoking bans may also have other benefits including a reduced incidence of smoking onset among children especially in households where parents smoke. In this analysis, home smoking bans modified the association between parental smoking and smoking onset in children. Similar to at least one other study […], the incidence rate of smoking onset was markedly higher among participants living in households with a ban in which both parents smoked. The incidence rate was 46.4 initiators per 100 person-surveys compared to 21.7 in no-ban households in which both parents smoked, which was much closer to the incidence observed when only one parent smoked whether or not there was a ban. » (p. 3) «All parents should be encouraged to implement complete home smoking bans in order to reduce secondhand smoke exposure in their children. However, in homes in which both parents smoke, it may be prudent that parents communicate clearly with their children about their reasons for implementing the ban as well as their reasons for continuing to smoke.» (p. 4)