The Role of Parental Achievement Goals in Predicting Autonomy-Supportive and Controlling Parenting

The Role of Parental Achievement Goals in Predicting Autonomy-Supportive and Controlling Parenting

The Role of Parental Achievement Goals in Predicting Autonomy-Supportive and Controlling Parenting

The Role of Parental Achievement Goals in Predicting Autonomy-Supportive and Controlling Parentings

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Référence bibliographique [17269]

Journal of Child & Family Studies, vol. 25, no 5, p. 1702-1711.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of the present research was thus to extend Gonida and Cortina’s study (1) by investigating the role of three parental achievement goals (i.e., mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance) rather than only two and (2) by including both mothers and adolescents rather than relying only on parent reports.» (p. 1704)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[W]e postulated that parental mastery goals would facilitate parental autonomy support but that they would not be associated with controlling parenting.» (p. 1704)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 67 dyades mère-adolescent recrutées dans les écoles secondaires montréalaises.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Overall, results showed that the more mothers have performance-approach goals for their adolescent and the less they focus on task mastery, the more they are perceived as controlling by their adolescent. These findings replicated the link between performance goals and controlling parenting found by Gonida and Cortina (2014) and extended these results (1) by showing that this link applies to performance-approach goals in particular and (2) by documenting an additional negative link between mastery goals and controlling parenting. This study also provided a more conservative test of these associations because key variables were assessed with different informants and while controlling for maternal anxiety. […] In addition, mothers who focus on task mastery and on preventing failure seem less likely to engage in guilt-induction, as perceived by their adolescents. Maternal goals did not seem to be relevant in predicting mothers’ use of threats. For autonomy support, results showed that parental goals did not predict maternal autonomy support in general. However, performance-approach goals may be an obstacle to the adoption of one autonomy-supportive behavior in particular, namely the acknowledgement of feelings.» (p. 1707-1708)