Father-Child Interactions and Children’s Risk of Injury

Father-Child Interactions and Children’s Risk of Injury

Father-Child Interactions and Children’s Risk of Injury

Father-Child Interactions and Children’s Risk of Injurys

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Référence bibliographique [17242]

StGeorge, Jennifer, Fletcher, Richard, Freeman, Emily, Paquette, Daniel et Dumont, Caroline. 2015. «Father-Child Interactions and Children’s Risk of Injury ». Early Child Development and Care, vol. 185, no 9, p. 1409-1421.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Given that fathers are key facilitators of childhood exploration, and that risk taking is part of this exploration, the aim of this study was to examine the role fathers play in minimising childhood injury risk. Specifically, we aimed to determine which aspects of father–child rough-and-tumble play and fathering behaviours would be related to minimising childhood risky behaviours.» (p. 1412)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«For this analysis, 46 father–child dyads (18 boys and 28 girls) from the longitudinal Montreal Study (Dumont & Paquette, 2013) were included.» (p. 1413)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results showed that most fathers were encouraging and facilitative of play and socialising, and they allowed their children to undertake some risky behaviours, but they were not overly punitive. Encouragement of perseverance and less risk-taking stimulation predicted lower injury-risk behaviour in preschoolers. Fathers’ involvement in physical play was also related to lower injury-risk behaviours. The results were consistent across child gender and fathers’ age.» (p. 1415) Authors also found that the «duration of fathers’ play with children in this study was related to their risky behaviour, while how often fathers played with their children was not. The longer fathers played with their children, the lower their score on the IBC [Injury Behaviour Checklist]. […] The apparent positive effect of the longer periods of physical play on injury-risk behaviour suggests that the interactions during the rough-and-tumble play were key.» (p. 1416)