The Internet and Friendship Seeking: Exploring the Role of Online Communication in Young, Recently Immigrated Women’s Social Lives

The Internet and Friendship Seeking: Exploring the Role of Online Communication in Young, Recently Immigrated Women’s Social Lives

The Internet and Friendship Seeking: Exploring the Role of Online Communication in Young, Recently Immigrated Women’s Social Lives

The Internet and Friendship Seeking: Exploring the Role of Online Communication in Young, Recently Immigrated Women’s Social Livess

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [17241]

eGirls, eCitizens , sous la dir. de Jane Bailey et Steeves, Valerie M., p. 109-128. Ottawa (Ontario): Presses de l’Université d’Ottawa.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of this article is to identify the factors that lead to the use of the internet as a tool in searching for friends, as told by adolescent female youths using their migratory experiences as a starting point. A better understanding of neighbourhood, sociocultural, and familial barriers could contribute to reflections about the eventual role that people who interact with these youths, such as immigrant welcoming agencies, educators, health care workers, and parents, could play in supporting young women as they seek to establish themselves in Canada.» (p. 112)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de six jeunes femmes d’origine africaine sub-saharienne récemment immigrées dans la ville de Gatineau (Québec).

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Participants described that family context could also facilitate or hinder their friendship and relationship seeking experiences. Conceptual categories that related to family context included the difficulty of communication with family members, liberty to socialize, and nonparental family relationships, which participants described as being helpful sources of advice when they felt less comfortable consulting their parents. Participants perceived communication with their fathers to be difficult […]. Since they perceived communication with their fathers to be difficult, participants mentioned that they would find it difficult to talk to their fathers about online problems. All participants found communication with their mothers to be easier than communication with their fathers, but noted that they could not speak freely with their mothers about all subjects, particularly if those subjects involved gender role expectations or social liberties […]. While participants found it easier to talk to their mothers, they did feel pressure to be model children in their mothers’ eyes. A model child, participants suggested, would minimize her own suffering and not articulate problems such as online conflict that could potentially cause parents to feel stress or trauma. Participants in this study described that their parents often did not allow them to go out or socialize with friends. Online communications allowed some participants to bypass these restrictions.» (p. 121-122)