Perceived Stigmatisation of Young Mothers: An Exploratory Study of Psychological and Social Experience

Perceived Stigmatisation of Young Mothers: An Exploratory Study of Psychological and Social Experience

Perceived Stigmatisation of Young Mothers: An Exploratory Study of Psychological and Social Experience

Perceived Stigmatisation of Young Mothers: An Exploratory Study of Psychological and Social Experiences

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Référence bibliographique [1613]

Whitley, Rob et Kirmayer, Laurence J. 2008. «Perceived Stigmatisation of Young Mothers: An Exploratory Study of Psychological and Social Experience ». Social Science and Medecine, vol. 66, no 2, p. 339-348.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The study was designed to examine the differential experience of motherhood between two different ethno-cultural groups living in the same inner-city neighbourhoods of Montreal Anglophone Euro-Canadians and Anglophone Afro-Caribbeans. » (p. 340)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
In total, 33 women participated in the study, almost all of who had at least one dependent child 3 years old or younger

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien et de discussion

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« A striking difference emerged from the data. Younger Anglophone Euro-Canadian participants felt severely stigmatised, which they attributed almost solely to their ‘young’ age of motherhood. In marked contrast, older Anglophone Euro-Canadian participants and Anglophone Afro-Caribbean participants of any age hardly mentioned stigma as a facet of even minor importance in their lives. The results section chiefly focuses on the perceived stigma of younger Anglophone Euro-Canadian participants through documentation of two significant processes that emerged from the data: (i) social exclusion and (ii) negative rumination. [...] From this study, we produce a grounded theory that Anglophone Euro-Canadian mothers in their early 20s may perceive stigma and experience social exclusion traditionally associated with ‘teenage mothers.’ This appears to have deleterious effects on various behavioural, affective and cognitive aspects of everyday life. We make theoretical links between perceived stigma and changing demographic norms, noting that it may serve a penological function upholding dominant ideals regarding ‘appropriate’ fertility behaviour. » (pp. 342; 347)