Contagious Depression: Negative Attachment Cognitions as a Moderator of the Temporal Association Between Parental Depression and Child Depression

Contagious Depression: Negative Attachment Cognitions as a Moderator of the Temporal Association Between Parental Depression and Child Depression

Contagious Depression: Negative Attachment Cognitions as a Moderator of the Temporal Association Between Parental Depression and Child Depression

Contagious Depression: Negative Attachment Cognitions as a Moderator of the Temporal Association Between Parental Depression and Child Depressions

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Référence bibliographique [1605]

Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, vol. 38, no 1, p. 16-26.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The goal of our study was to examine whether children who exhibit negative attachment cognitions are more likely than other children to experience increases in depressive symptoms following increases in their parents’ levels of depressive symptoms. » (p. 17)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« We hypothesized that negative attachment related cognitions would be associated with greater elevations in children’s level of depressive symptoms following elevations in their parent’s level of depressive symptoms. » (p. 18)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The final sample consisted of 140 children (69 boys and 71 girls) and one of their parents (88 mothers and 14 fathers). Thirty-eight sibling pairs were included in the final sample. » (p. 18)

Instruments :
- Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I (SCID-I; First, Gibbon, Spitzer, & Williams, 2001)
- Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1981)
- Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (Armsden & Greenberg, 1987)
- Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present Version (K-SADS; Kaufman, Birmaher, Brent, Rao, & Ryan, 1996)
- Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh, 1961)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« In sum, the results of the current study suggest that Bowlby’s (1980) attachment theory may prove to be a useful framework for understanding individual differences in vulnerability to depressive symptoms in children of affectively ill parents. As our study examined only one possible factor that may make youth more susceptible to the deleterious impact of parental depression, future research is needed examining additional cognitive and interpersonal vulnerability factors. Identifying the factors that confer vulnerability to depression among high-risk youth is likely to be beneficial in guiding clinicians and researchers in designing effective treatment and prevention programs for such youth. Given the high level of risk for developing depression among such children, research in this area is desperately needed. » (p. 24-25)