Parents’ Decision-Making About The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine For Their Daughters: I. Quantitative Results

Parents’ Decision-Making About The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine For Their Daughters: I. Quantitative Results

Parents’ Decision-Making About The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine For Their Daughters: I. Quantitative Results

Parents’ Decision-Making About The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine For Their Daughters: I. Quantitative Resultss

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Référence bibliographique [12892]

Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, vol. 11, no 2, p. 322-329.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]his study sought to identify key differences between parents who obtain (acceptors) and parents who refuse (non-acceptors) the HPV [human papillomavirus] vaccine for their daughters.» (p. 322)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[W]e hypothesized that uptake of the HPV vaccine would be related to greater perceived susceptibility of daughters to HPV infection, greater perceived severity of the infection, greater perceived benefits of the vaccine, fewer perceived barriers, and more cues to action. Second, as found in previous HPV vaccination acceptability literature, we hypothesized that individual factors (such as positive general vaccination attitudes and anticipated inaction regret - e.g., worry about regretting not obtaining the vaccine), behavioral factors (including adherence to routinely recommended vaccination), and social factors (including positive media exposure and social norms), would also be associated with vaccine uptake.» (p. 323)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 834 parents de la province du Québec.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our study displayed mixed findings regarding parental knowledge. Although our univariate analyses found no effects of HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge on uptake, our multivariate model found knowledge to have a negative impact on vaccine uptake. These mixed findings may be due to constricted variance as it was common for parents to have low knowledge about HPV. Indeed, even in our qualitative findings, both parents who accepted and refused the HPV vaccine expressed having little to no knowledge about HPV. Although conceptualized as a critical factor in enabling informed decisions, the role of HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge in parental vaccination decision making remains unclear with some studies showing a positive relationship and others showing no or negative relationships. Research limitations such as the inconsistent use of validated measures across studies, or differences in conceptualization of knowledge constructs, may contribute to these mixed results. However, regardless of the role of knowledge in vaccine decision-making, parents do express wanting more information about HPV in order to be confident in their decisions. As such, parents are likely to be receptive to interventions that include an educational component. In line with our second hypothesis, the results of this study show that other factors not directly included in the HBM (such as anticipated regret) were also associated with vaccination uptake.» (p. 325)