The Effect of Childhood Adversity on Clinical Severity in Mood Disorders

The Effect of Childhood Adversity on Clinical Severity in Mood Disorders

The Effect of Childhood Adversity on Clinical Severity in Mood Disorders

The Effect of Childhood Adversity on Clinical Severity in Mood Disorderss

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Référence bibliographique [12891]

Kraus, Giselle. 2014. «The Effect of Childhood Adversity on Clinical Severity in Mood Disorders». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de psychiatrie.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study uses a mood disorder sample from a tertiary-care clinic to carry out the following objectives: Objective 1. To determine the prevalence and severity of different forms of childhood adversity in mood disorders, specifically: (1) parental loss or separation, (2) parental antipathy, (3) parental neglect, (4) parental psychological abuse, (5) physical abuse, (6) sexual abuse, and (7) role reversal. Objective 2. To examine the association between different types of childhood adversity and clinical severity indicators, specifically: (1) age of onset of mood disorder, (2) age of first psychiatric treatment, (3) duration of untreated illness, (4) number of comorbid psychiatric disorders, (5) number of psychiatric hospitalizations, and (6) number of lifetime suicide attempts. Objective 3. To test if sex modifies the association between different forms of childhood adversity and clinical severity indicators.» (p. 16)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon compte «162 patients adultes d’une clinique externe de soins tertiaires avec un diagnostic de TDM [trouble dépressif majeur] (N=63), TB [trouble bipolaire] de type I (N=64), et TB de type II (N=35).» (p. 6)

Instruments :
- Entrevue Clinique Structurée pour le DSM-IV
- Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA-Q3)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«About 40% of the sample experienced marked antipathy from at least one parent during childhood, 39% experienced marked neglect from at least one parent, 32% experienced physical abuse, 31% experienced sexual abuse, and 25% experienced death or long separation from a parent. The clinical severity indicators of age of mood disorder onset, number of psychiatric comorbidities, and duration of untreated mood disorder were associated with the most forms of childhood adversity. Furthermore, there was a sex by physical abuse interaction on risk of lifetime psychiatric hospitalization. Women who experienced any physical abuse during childhood had a 6-fold increased risk of being hospitalized for psychiatric reasons during their lifetime, as compared to males, and women who experienced maternal physical abuse during childhood had a 17-fold increased risk of lifetime psychiatric hospitalization, as compared to males. […] This study provides further evidence that childhood adversity, especially child abuse and neglect, are associated with negative long-term consequences and are related to an earlier onset age of mood disorders, an earlier age of psychiatric treatment, a longer duration of untreated illness, and more comorbid psychiatric disorders, suicide attempts, and psychiatric hospitalizations.» (p. 5)