Transforming Communities: Suicide, Relatedness, and Reclamation Among Inuit of Nunavut

Transforming Communities: Suicide, Relatedness, and Reclamation Among Inuit of Nunavut

Transforming Communities: Suicide, Relatedness, and Reclamation Among Inuit of Nunavut

Transforming Communities: Suicide, Relatedness, and Reclamation Among Inuit of Nunavuts

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Référence bibliographique [1279]

Kral, Michael. 2009. «Transforming Communities: Suicide, Relatedness, and Reclamation Among Inuit of Nunavut». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université McGill, Département d’anthropologie.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In this dissertation I explore the nature of relational change among Inuit, and the returning of collective agency, the example in this case being community action organized by youth toward suicide
prevention and well-being. I argue that understanding the process of community-based action toward wellness is the key to suicide prevention in Nunavut, and a local example of the larger agenda of reclamation and sovereignty among Inuit. » (p. 58)

Questions/Hypothèses:
« A key puzzle in this thesis is the question of how social relations have changed in a culture where they formed its central organizing core. How does suicide represent these changes, and how it is that suicide has become deeply embedded in sexual/romantic relationships among youth? Finally, for youth who are organizing themselves and their communities to offset this tragedy, how are family and community relations helping and hindering their efforts? Most importantly, what is the social process of community youth organization toward well-being? » (p. 59)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


« This thesis is the story of how forms of relatedness in social organization and kinship changed among Inuit after the Canadian government assumed control of their lives. Respect and affection are identified as attributes through which to understand important contexts of relationship among Inuit. Kin and other relations are reviewed before major contact with the Western world, followed by a close look at the dynamics of relational and social change in a number of contexts during the government era after the 1950s. These shifts are readily identifiable in Inuit youth suicide, which as one form of social perturbation can be viewed as a postcolonial disorder. Inuit in Nunavut under the age of 24 have a suicide rate ten times the rate of Canada. This thesis examines the lives of Inuit male youth, and analyzes the relationships – particularly sexual and familial – in which suicidality becomes manifest. The thesis then shifts to the recent efforts by youth to stop the suicides. The activities of youth in this regard represent a reclaiming of collective agency at the community level. The youth implemented programs that, with community support, stopped the suicides for a period of time. Igloolik is one of two communities described that benefited from this social action by youth. The thesis analyzes the successes in this community by tracing the development of a local youth group and its efforts at community action. This thesis is a story of transformation by outside and then by inside forces. In conclusion, the thesis examines some of the struggles of Inuit youth today, and the means by which male youth can become resilient and collective efforts of youth can be sustained into the future. » (p. 2)