A Child’s View: Social and Physical Environmental Features Differentially Predict Parent and Child Perceived Neighborhood Safety

A Child’s View: Social and Physical Environmental Features Differentially Predict Parent and Child Perceived Neighborhood Safety

A Child’s View: Social and Physical Environmental Features Differentially Predict Parent and Child Perceived Neighborhood Safety

A Child’s View: Social and Physical Environmental Features Differentially Predict Parent and Child Perceived Neighborhood Safetys

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Référence bibliographique [12677]

Côté-Lussier, Carolyn, Jackson, Jonathan, Kestens, Yan, Henderson, Melanie et Barnett, Tracie A. 2014. «A Child’s View: Social and Physical Environmental Features Differentially Predict Parent and Child Perceived Neighborhood Safety ». Journal of Urban Health, vol. 92, no 1, p. 10-23.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study addresses an important gap in the literature which has yet to address the environmental predictors of child perceived neighborhood safety or to jointly examine parent and child perceived safety. Furthermore, the study considers predictors of child perceived safety among a vulnerable population.» (p. 12)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The main hypothesis is that children’s perceptions of safety are directly associated with environmental features indicative of traffic and personal safety. A second hypothesis is that environmental features are also indirectly associated with child perceived safety, by virtue of their influence on parent perceived safety.» (p. 12)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The QUebec Adipose and Lifestyle InvesTigation in Youth (QUALITY) studies the natural history of the development of childhood obesity and its metabolic and cardiovascular consequences in a cohort of 630 children and both biological parents living in Québec, Canada.» (p. 12)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Parent and child perceived unsafety represent risks for child health. This study suggests that children’s perceptions of safety could be improved by increasing the neighborhood level of greenery and lighting. Because of the link between parent and child perceived safety and parents’ ability to shape their child’s behaviors and health, improving parent perceived safety (e.g., by removing graffiti and garbage and reducing traffic flow) should also be part of strategies to improve child health and well-being. Future research addressing the association between neighborhood safety and child health should consider both parent and child perceptions of safety, as this study demonstrates that each are determined by distinct environmental features that could come to directly and indirectly affect child well-being.» (p. 21)