Longitudinal Testing of a Dietary Self-Care Motivational Model in Adolescents with Diabetes

Longitudinal Testing of a Dietary Self-Care Motivational Model in Adolescents with Diabetes

Longitudinal Testing of a Dietary Self-Care Motivational Model in Adolescents with Diabetes

Longitudinal Testing of a Dietary Self-Care Motivational Model in Adolescents with Diabetess

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [12537]

Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 75, no 2, p. 153-159.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study aims to shed light on the mechanisms by which motivational factors for dietary self-care are facilitated in adolescents with diabetes. Based on SDT [self-determination theory], longitudinal relationships between environmental and motivational factors for dietary self-care are examined.» (p. 153)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«It was hypothesized that autonomy support from parents and health care providers at T1 [time one] would relate positively to perceived autonomous self-regulation and self-efficacy at T2 [time two], and that this perception at T1 would relate positively to dietary self-care at T2.» (p. 155)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were recruited from two major pediatric diabetes centers in Québec (Canada). In all, 316 patients were invited to participate, of whom 289 (156 boys) agreed.» (p. 154)

Instruments :
- Autonomous Self-Regulation Scale
- Perception of Parents Scale (POPS)
- Health Care Climate Questionnaire
- Diet subscale of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities scale

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results support most of the hypothesized relationships, except for the proposal that parental autonomy fosters subsequent motivational factors. However, consistent with past research, autonomy support from health care providers positively predicts autonomous self-regulation and self-efficacy over time. The results also show that these motivational factors were associated with dietary self-care over two years. Autonomous self-regulation and dietary self-care were reciprocally related: improvement in one contributes to improvement in the other. Moreover, self-efficacy predicted subsequent perceived autonomy support from parents, and equivalently for boys and girls. The results revealed no association between parental support and adolescents’ motivational factors, although these constructs were significantly related. […] This study suggests that the more adolescents feel that health care providers understand their dietary self-care challenges, accept them as they are, and provide them with choices, the more they will be autonomously motivated toward dietary self-care, and the greater their confidence in achieving this over time.» (p. 155-156)