Mothers of the Nation: The Effect of Nationalist Ideology on Women’s Reproductive Rights in Ireland and Iran

Mothers of the Nation: The Effect of Nationalist Ideology on Women’s Reproductive Rights in Ireland and Iran

Mothers of the Nation: The Effect of Nationalist Ideology on Women’s Reproductive Rights in Ireland and Iran

Mothers of the Nation: The Effect of Nationalist Ideology on Women’s Reproductive Rights in Ireland and Irans

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Référence bibliographique [12388]

O’Mahoney, Sarah. 2008. «Mothers of the Nation: The Effect of Nationalist Ideology on Women’s Reproductive Rights in Ireland and Iran». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de droit.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Dans la présente thèse, j’analyserai comment l’emphase placée sur les mères dévouées en tant que symboles de la nation dans le cadre d’idéologies nationalistes peut, lorsque codifiée en droit, engendrer des effets néfastes pour ce qui concerne l’autonomie reproductive des femmes.» (p. i) L’auteure compare la situation de l’Irlande et de l’Iran.

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«This project has outlined the root causes of religious nationalism in both the Republic of Ireland and the Islamic Republic of Iran, and studied the effect that it has had on the reproductive rights of women. Though the two countries profiled are vastly different there are a significant number of similarities regarding post-revolutionary nationalist ideology and its negative consequences for women’s autonomy generally. Both states exhibited a central focus on controlling women’s sexuality and justified this control through emphasising the importance of the motherhood role to the nation. […] When the proper role of women is so tightly tied to national identity, women who venture outside this role are seen as traitors to their national collectivity. The religio-nationalist discourse in both countries focused heavily on centrality of the motherhood role for women. In particular, discourses of the familial nation constructed women as the ‘mothers of the nation’, and thus ‘naturally’ subordinated them to men in their designated role as the father/protector/provider. […] This focus on motherhood was transcribed into the constitutions of both the Republic of Ireland and the Islamic Republic of Iran. When women are presented primarily as mothers, instead of individuals, in a state’s constitution, it legitimizes limiting their autonomy in order to ensure they reproduce. Thus their rights as citizens are thus subordinated to the importance of their role as mothers. Both in post-revolution Ireland and Iran political and legal measures were used in attempts to confine women to maternal and domestic roles. […] Limiting women’s ability to control their fertility is justified through the perceived need for a strong nation state, especially when the state concerned has been the subject of imperialist interference and control.» (p. 97-99)