Socioeconomic Disparities in Low Birth Weight Outcomes According to Maternal Birthplace in Québec, Canada

Socioeconomic Disparities in Low Birth Weight Outcomes According to Maternal Birthplace in Québec, Canada

Socioeconomic Disparities in Low Birth Weight Outcomes According to Maternal Birthplace in Québec, Canada

Socioeconomic Disparities in Low Birth Weight Outcomes According to Maternal Birthplace in Québec, Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [1194]

Ethnicity and Health, vol. 14, no 1, p. 61-74.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Studies in the USA suggest that the association between maternal birthplace, socioeconomic status (SES), and low birth weight (LBW) can vary across different immigrant groups. Less is known outside the USA about these associations. Our study assesses the association of maternal birthplace and SES on the likelihood of LBW infants in Québec, Canada. » (p. 61)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Using 2000 Québec birth registry data, logistic regression was used to examine differentials in LBW according to maternal birthplace and SES. Singleton infants born to Québec mothers (n 47,988) were grouped into nine regions based on maternal birthplace: (1) Canada; (2) the USA and western Europe; (3) eastern Europe; (4) Latin America; (5) the Caribbean; (6) Sub-Saharan Africa; (7) north Africa and Middle East; (8) South Asia; and (9) East Asia and Pacific. »

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Our research suggests the presence in Québec, Canada of variations in LBW according to maternal birthplace and SES. Three main conclusions arise from this study: (1) the strength and direction of the association between foreign-born status and LBW varies according to maternal birthplace; (2) among singleton births in 2001, South Asian and Caribbean-born mothers had a higher likelihood of LBW infants than high SES Canadian-born mothers; and (3) paradoxically, high SES South Asian- and Caribbean-born mothers have a higher likelihood of LBW outcomes than low SES South Asian- and Caribbean-born mothers. » (p. 69) « Our analysis and results underscore the importance of investigating variations in the association of foreign-born status with LBW outcomes by maternal birthplace. The finding that South Asian- and Caribbean-born mothers have a higher prevalence and odds of LBW outcomes than Canadian-born mothers suggests that universal access to medical services and government-sponsored preventive services may not be sufficient to reduce perinatal health disparities among different social groups in Canada. Research that helps detect those social groups with more unfavorable health outcomes can aid the development of public health policies and interventions that Ethnicity & Health might better target higher-risk groups and address social disparities in perinatal health. » (p. 71-72)