Remote Midwifery in Nunavik, Quebec, Canada: Outcomes of Perinatal Care for the Inuulitsivik Health Centre, 2000-2007

Remote Midwifery in Nunavik, Quebec, Canada: Outcomes of Perinatal Care for the Inuulitsivik Health Centre, 2000-2007

Remote Midwifery in Nunavik, Quebec, Canada: Outcomes of Perinatal Care for the Inuulitsivik Health Centre, 2000-2007

Remote Midwifery in Nunavik, Quebec, Canada: Outcomes of Perinatal Care for the Inuulitsivik Health Centre, 2000-2007 s

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Référence bibliographique [11895]

Wagner, Vicki Van, Osepchook, Claire, Harney, Evelyn, Crosbie, Colleen et Tulugak, Mina. 2012. «Remote Midwifery in Nunavik, Quebec, Canada: Outcomes of Perinatal Care for the Inuulitsivik Health Centre, 2000-2007 ». Birth. Issues in Perinatal Care, vol. 39, no 3, p. 230-237.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study of outcomes of midwifery care in the Inuulitsivik birth centers from 2000 to 2007 aims to contribute to greater understanding of northern and remote maternity care and to the improvement of perinatal care in this and other remote regions.» (p. 232)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We examined outcomes for 1,372 labors and 1,382 babies, which included eight sets of twins and one set of triplets.» (p. 232)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This study contributes to policy discussions about maternity care in small centers by documenting the outcomes of remote low-volume birth centers. Our research provides clinical data that support recommendations promoting the development of Aboriginal midwifery and bringing birth back to remote and northern communities (3, 5–9). As midwifery continues to develop in Nunavut and other Inuit regions of Canada, there is potential for aligned data collection and analysis, linked with the evolution of provincial, territorial and national perinatal data initiatives. Most pregnant women on the Hudson coast are attended by Inuit midwives educated in Nunavik. The success of this remote maternity service rests on their knowledge and skills within a broad scope of practice. Nunavik midwifery evolved from strong community support and is maintained through Inuit leadership, collaboration between midwives from north and south, and effective support of an interprofessional health team. This model of returning birth to remote communities seems to have much to offer and should be considered for communities wishing to reestablish birth services.» (p. 236-237)