Risk Factor Models for Adolescent Verbal and Physical Aggression Toward Fathers

Risk Factor Models for Adolescent Verbal and Physical Aggression Toward Fathers

Risk Factor Models for Adolescent Verbal and Physical Aggression Toward Fathers

Risk Factor Models for Adolescent Verbal and Physical Aggression Toward Fatherss

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Référence bibliographique [1152]

Pagani, Linda, Tremblay, Richard E., Nagin, Daniel, Zoccolillo, Mark, Vitaro, Frank et McDuff, Pierre. 2009. «Risk Factor Models for Adolescent Verbal and Physical Aggression Toward Fathers ». Journal of Family Violence, vol. 24, no 3, p. 173-182.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[...] [T]he purpose of this study is to generate a profile of prospective (childhood) and concurrent individual and family risk factors associated with verbal and physical aggression toward fathers by adolescent sons and daughters.» (pp.174-175)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Because fathers might be more likely to use authoritarian parenting strategies which tend to model hostility and coercion, we hypothesize that parents who use more aggressive means are expected to experience more aggression from their children, given the greater reciprocal perceptions of hostile intentions on both parts.» (p.175)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
774 adolescents (374 garçons et 400 filles) (données tirées de l’Étude longitudinale des enfants de maternelle au Québec)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Using a French-Canadian population-based longitudinal data set, we examine the impact of socioeconomic factors (paternal education and family structure); inherent individual factors (child gender and developmental trajectories of physical aggression from early to later childhood, problematic substance use), family environment (concurrent parent-child involvement, parental problematic substance use), and prospective and concurrent parenting process variables (mean parental supervision at puberty, concurrent punishment practices) as predictors of adolescent-directed aggression against fathers (in the last 6 months). A childhood behavioral pattern characterized by physical aggression showed the highest risk of adolescent-directed verbal and physical aggression toward fathers, regardless of sex. In terms of parental practices, verbal (and not corporal) punishment in the last 6 months significantly predicted aggression toward fathers. A childhood life-course of violence is likely to culminate in aggression toward fathers during adolescence. Beyond this risk, it seems that harsh verbal punishment by parents builds up the odds of childdirected aggression against fathers.» (p.173)