Child Citizenship and Agency as Shaped by Legal Obligations

Child Citizenship and Agency as Shaped by Legal Obligations

Child Citizenship and Agency as Shaped by Legal Obligations

Child Citizenship and Agency as Shaped by Legal Obligationss

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Référence bibliographique [11303]

Campbell, Angela, Carnevale, Marissa, Jackson, Suzanne, Carnevale, Franco, Collin-Vézina, Deiphine et Macdonalcf, Mary Ellen. 2011. «Child Citizenship and Agency as Shaped by Legal Obligations ». Child & Family Law Quarterly, vol. 23, no 4, p. 489-512.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article maintains that the legal recognition of obligations for children facilitates their recognition as citizens and agents when such obligations are understood from contextual and relational perspectives» (p. 489)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses qui comprennent plusieurs cas de jurisprudence québécoise et des lois en lien avec le code civil.

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«Drawing primarily upon sources from Canada and the United States, the article advances this claim through a study of three separate settings. Part I examines the ’child as student’ and studies children’s obligations within schools. Part II considers the ’street child’ and the obligations and challenges children encounter when they live away from their families and communities. Part Ill contemplates the ’child as bargainer’ and focuses on obligations children assume when accessing, negotiating for and acquiring services in their communities.» (p. 489) «Legal sources contribute significantly to revealing the ways in which children can be meaningful members of their families and communities. Children are viewed as having rights, which may be tailored to, and limited by, competing interests relating, for example, to security or protection. […] While the child as student is obliged to avoid compromising school safety and to exhibit tolerance for diverse opinions, the street child must provide for herself while respecting laws targeting indigent children. Meanwhile, the child as bargainer must adhere to appropriate commercial undertakings, involve parents in decisions with considerable health effects and respect juridical norms, even when these involve incursions into private family life.» (p. 510)