Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions and Uptake in College Women

Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions and Uptake in College Women

Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions and Uptake in College Women

Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions and Uptake in College Womens

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Référence bibliographique [10851]

Health Psychology, vol. 31, no 5, p. 685-693.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The overall objective of this study was to identify which theoretically based factors differentiate between women who do not intend to receive the HPV vaccine, who intend to receive the HPV vaccine, and who have been vaccinated.» (p. 686)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[T]he first hypothesis was that vaccination intentions would be correlated to: (a) higher perceived susceptibility to HPV, (b) higher perceived severity of HPV, (c) higher perceived benefit of the HPV vaccine, (d) lower perceived barrier to the HPV vaccine, (e) higher physician recommendation, (f) higher positive attitudes toward the vaccine, (g) higher positive subjective norms toward vaccination, and (h) higher belief in one’s behavioral control. [T]he second hypothesis was that only physician recommendation (cue to action) and the influence of significant others (subjective norms) would be significant correlates of vaccination uptake beyond the other factors in the model.» (p. 686)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«A total of 447 female undergraduates from McGill University participated in the current study. The mean age was 20 years (SD = 2.7, range: 18–43).» (p. 686)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The current study adds to a growing body of literature on factors that are associated with HPV vaccination decision-making, while using theory driven frameworks. From a theoretical perspective, understanding the relationship between intentions and actual behavior is of utmost importance. From a practical perspective, it is critical to understand the factors that influence young women’s vaccination behavior, given the rapidly emerging evidence of HPV-related diseases combined with the relatively low rates of vaccination uptake in many jurisdictions. The findings of this study suggest that trusted individuals (e.g., doctors, friends, family) are of particular importance in motivating young women to receive the vaccine beyond other factors of the HBM and TPB.» (p. 691) The authors emphasize «[t]he influence of peers and parents [which] is also critical in affecting young women’s vaccination decisions. It is important to educate not only young women, but also their parents and peers about the safety, efficacy, and importance of the HPV vaccine in order to increase HPV knowledge and to facilitate conversations about the vaccine.» (p. 690)