Childhood Aggression, Withdrawal and Likeability, and the Use of Health Care Later: A Longitudinal Study

Childhood Aggression, Withdrawal and Likeability, and the Use of Health Care Later: A Longitudinal Study

Childhood Aggression, Withdrawal and Likeability, and the Use of Health Care Later: A Longitudinal Study

Childhood Aggression, Withdrawal and Likeability, and the Use of Health Care Later: A Longitudinal Studys

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Référence bibliographique [10282]

Journal de l’association médicale canadienne / Canadian Medical Association Journal, vol. 183, no 18, p. 2095-2101.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«We looked at use of health care and a variety of physical health outcomes in adulthood to extend the current body of knowledge regarding the long-term negative sequelae of childhood aggression.» (p. 2095)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants of the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Project were eligible for the current study if they had received medical care in the province of Quebec between 1992 and 2006, and if we were able to retrieve their medical and education records.» (p. 2095) Note that 3913 persons, all from the Montreal area, participated to the study.

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the authors, «[d]uring the 15-year period studied, childhood agression corresponded to an increase in medical visits (8.1% per 1 standard deviation increase in agression), and injuries (10.7%) or lifestyle-related illnesses (44.2%), visits to specialists (6.2%) and visits to emergency departments (12.4%). We saw a positive relation between social withdrawal during childhood and government-funded visits to dentists. Peer-rated likeability during childhood showed negative relations with use of health care (overall), medical visits due to injuries and government-funded visits to dentists. […] Childhood aggression is a health risk that should be considered when designing interventions to improve public health and diminish the costs of medical services, particularly when considering interventions targeting children and families.» (p. 2095)