Addressing the Needs of Parents with Intellectual Disabilities: Exploring a Parenting Pilot Project

Addressing the Needs of Parents with Intellectual Disabilities: Exploring a Parenting Pilot Project

Addressing the Needs of Parents with Intellectual Disabilities: Exploring a Parenting Pilot Project

Addressing the Needs of Parents with Intellectual Disabilities: Exploring a Parenting Pilot Projects

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [10277]

MacLean, Katie et Aunos, Marjorie. 2010. «Addressing the Needs of Parents with Intellectual Disabilities: Exploring a Parenting Pilot Project ». Le journal sur les handicaps du développement, vol. 16, no 1, p. 18-33.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The authors will provide a detailed description of the creation and implementation of a group for parents with intellectual disabilities, and will do so according to three objectives. The first is to describe the participants’ perception of curriculum, and the second is to describe the participant and staff satisfaction with the program. [...] The third objective is to provide a detailed description of the project that will encourage replication, addressing the paucity of services for parents with intellectual disabilities.» (p. 21)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants in the parenting project were identified through the rehabilitation centre’s access department.» (p. 22) In total, seven parents participated and an indefinite number of workers. «The workers involved in supporting their clients involved in the parenting project were employed by the rehabilitation centre. [...] The group was facilitated primarily by social work and psychoeducation interns completing their internships at the rehabilitation centre, as well as professional social workers.» (p. 23)

Instruments :
- Questionnaires
- Guide d’entretien (pour les entrevues avec des travailleurs)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


According to the author, «[t]he objectives of the parenting project were to determine the learning needs of parents with intellectual disabilities through interviews and assessments, to develop and implement a curriculum based on these needs, and to evaluate the key informants’ satisfaction with the project. Within the parenting project, parents were viewed as experts who were capable of caring for their children, developing their children’s potential, and having an influence on their development, regardless of the level of involvement in their children’s lives. […] According to its key stakeholders, the parenting project was a valuable support for parents with intellectual disabilities, as it provided parents with a weekly opportunity to meet with other parents, learn new things, and share experiences. The high attendance and participation of the participants is also indicative of the participants’ satisfaction, and relatively rare for programs with this population [...]. The mechanism of the group itself was useful to the participants, as they had a regular forum to bring their problems and questions, and were able to obtain support and information given in a way that was adapted to their learning needs.» (p. 29)