Measurement of Gender Inequality in Neighbourhoods of Québec, Canada

Measurement of Gender Inequality in Neighbourhoods of Québec, Canada

Measurement of Gender Inequality in Neighbourhoods of Québec, Canada

Measurement of Gender Inequality in Neighbourhoods of Québec, Canadas

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International Journal for Equity in Health, vol. 10, no 52, p. 1-9.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The authors, «[...] sought to develop neighbourhood indicators to determine if gender inequality is present in the province of Québec, and assess their ability to capture variability in gender inequality across parts of Québec.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Aggregate data available for 11,612 Québec dissemination areas (DA) were extracted from the 2001 population census produced by Statistics Canada. [...] The final sample consisted of 11,564 DAs.» (p. 2)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This study found that neighbourhood-level gender inequality tended to be present, and varied across different parts of Québec. In most neighbourhoods, men tended to dominate women for income, employment rate, labour force participation, and employment in managerial positions, whereas women tended to dominate men for divorce, single-headed households, and participation in unpaid work. The indicators identified in this study may be useful for raising awareness on the existence of gender inequality in Canada to improve gender equality policies. Other countries may benefit from examining dimensions that tended to show the highest gender inequality in Québec, including demographic and household characteristics, income, work and leisure, or other dimensions not explored in this study.» (p. 8) Note that this article presents data on the basis of marital status and family income. The authors noted that «[i]n Québec, female lone parenthood is socially accepted, which may explain why we found female dominant gender inequality in single-headed households. Furthermore, female-dominant gender inequality in divorce may be associated with female emancipation, or less restrictive divorce laws introduced in the 1980s.» (p. 7)