Searching for Happiness: The Importance of Social Capital

Searching for Happiness: The Importance of Social Capital

Searching for Happiness: The Importance of Social Capital

Searching for Happiness: The Importance of Social Capitals

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Référence bibliographique [10032]

Leung, Ambrose, Kier, Cheryl, Fung, Tak, Fung, Linda et Sproule, Robert. 2011. «Searching for Happiness: The Importance of Social Capital ». Journal of Happiness Studies, vol. 12, no 3, p. 443-462.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between happiness and different forms of social capital.» (p. 444)

Questions/Hypothèses :
The authors hypothesized «[…] that social capital is a vital piece of information for predicting happiness.» (p. 453)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The present study uses data collected by Statistics Canada in 2003 from the General Social Survey (GSS) cycle 17.» (p. 447) L’échantillon regroupe 15 660 personnes.

Instruments :
Sondage

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In short, this study has identified measures for social capital in the forms of trust and obligations, information channels, norms and sanctions, and belongingness that are related to happiness. Our results confirm our hypothesis that social capital is a vital piece of information for predicting happiness. While people may not be able to change their internal or external characteristics, some aspects of their social may be modifiable. In addition to demographic and individual factors such as age, income, and health conditions, future research should include variables representing social capital when exploring what accounts for happiness.» (p. 453)
Note : L’article comprend des statistiques interprovinciales. Aussi, les auteurs considèrent la question de la qualité des relations familiales et de la confiance entre les membres de la famille pour aborder le niveau de bonheur des répondants.