Associations Between Sleep-Wake Consolidation and Language Development in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Twin Study

Associations Between Sleep-Wake Consolidation and Language Development in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Twin Study

Associations Between Sleep-Wake Consolidation and Language Development in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Twin Study

Associations Between Sleep-Wake Consolidation and Language Development in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Twin Studys

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Référence bibliographique [10001]

Sleep, vol. 34, no 8, p. 987-995.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objectives were (1) to assess associations between sleep consolidation at 6, 18 and 30 months and language skills at 18, 30, and 60 months; and (2) to investigate the genetic/environmental etiology of these associations.» (p. 987)

Questions/Hypothèses :
The authors «[...] hypothesized that children with persistent or late onset language delays would have shown less mature sleep consolidation at earlier ages.» (p. 988)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The sample includes «1029 twins from the Quebec Newborn Twin Study». (p. 987)

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien
- Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the authors «[t]he day/night sleep ratio decreased significantly from 6 to 30 months. The 6- and 18-month ratios were negatively correlated with subsequent language skills. Children with language delays at 60 months had less mature sleep consolidation at both 6 and 18 months than children without delays and those with transient early delays. Genetic and regression analyses revealed that the sleep ratio at 6 months was highly heritable (64%) and predicted 18-month [...] and 30-month language [...] mainly through additive genetic influences [...]. By contrast, the sleep ratio at 18 months was mainly due to shared environment influences (58%) and predicted 60-month language [...] through shared environment influences [...]. Poor sleep consolidation during the first 2 years of life may be a risk factor for language learning, whereas good sleep consolidation may foster language learning through successive genetic and environmental influences.» (p. 987)
Note : Cet article prend en compte le contexte familial, notamment ce qui concerne la mère.